Small Woodland Owners' Group

Flat Pack Shipping Container

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Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby davetb » Tue May 20, 2014 8:02 pm

We live in Cardiff, have no garage and live in an area with a huge crime rate in thefts from garden sheds.
We have 3 sheds but keep all our bikes / chainsaws in a leaking conservatory.
We need to reclaim the space in our house.
I have just bought a flat pack shipping container for the bottom of the garden.
Each wall, base and roof can be carried by 2 people to a suitable spot and it all bolts together.
It is meant for areas that a crane ( and conventional shipping container, can't reach ).
It can be bolted together in 20 mins, they say - we took over an hour, in the rain.
Looks a fantastic ( but expensive ) bit of kit.
I have bought a 3m container for the garden - green one in the picture. ( 2.1x2.1 x3.1m)
Total cost inc. delivery was about £1850.
I plan to put all the expensive items - strimmed/ 3 chainsaws / all family bikes / lawnmowers in it.
It weighs 400kg, smaller 2.1m cube is 325kg.
I now fancy a 2.1m cube, for the woods.
I will have to save my pennies, and try to convince my wife.
It would take a huge amount of effort to break in.
I posted a picture on FB and it's generated a huge interest with my FB friends.
Thought I'd post a pic on here as a pretty secure 'woodland' option.
I have no connection to the manufacturers - I ordered it in March but only got it last week, after threatening to cancel my order.
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davetb
 
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby oldclaypaws » Tue May 20, 2014 8:20 pm

Looks great, expensive though. Isn't it only as secure as the lock on it? There's not much will stand up to boltcutters, large crowbar or a sledge. Trouble is the more something looks like it has valuables, the more curiosity it will arouse.
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby davetb » Tue May 20, 2014 8:38 pm

I agree.
From the website -
Complete with two 64mm Euro deadlocks with replaceable cylinders and a central roller catch. Door width: 1250mm, hinged on the right, outward opening.

You can buy extra bars to lock across the 2 deadlocks with padlocks.
We bought one, but don't think it's necessary in our garden.
The plumber who helped move the base down our garden said , " wow - proper locks".
It looks good to me, but 'the proof is in the pudding', I'll have to wait to see if it's broken into.
I would love one, in my woods, but the cost has to be considered.
It has helpful hooks on top to lift up, and steal.
It can take 1500kg, and 'crane' away.
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Location: Cardiff ( woodland is near Monmouth )

Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby Wendelspanswick » Tue May 20, 2014 8:41 pm

The best solution I have seen for a lock is to have the padlock on the inside of the door with two hand sized holes to access the lock from outside which you do by feel! If you box in the lock and holes on the inside there is no room to operate bolt cutters even if you could do it blind.
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby davetb » Tue May 20, 2014 8:55 pm

Bolt cutters will not work on these locks.
An angle grinder will quickly cut a hole.
You can't stop properly equipped people.
If you angle grind it in my garden, I will hear.
You will get in, in a remote site with a cordless angle grinder.
Nothing will stop a cordless angle grinder.
I think this will stop anyone who chances upon it, whatever tools they happen to have.
A pre planned, determined person will get in.
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby Zathras » Thu Jun 05, 2014 8:46 am

davetb wrote:Nothing will stop a cordless angle grinder.
I think this will stop anyone who chances upon it, whatever tools they happen to have.
A pre planned, determined person will get in.


This is good to know as it was the same unit I was saving up for - to replace my security locker - though that was before the locker was broken into.
However, I had recently changed my mind after hearing some personal tales from others with them.

Apparently they do have an issue with leaking as they are bolted together rather than welded, also you have the same old condensation build up so it would benefit from some good insulation if you want to store anything that could rust.

The clincher for me though was when a woodsman helper gave me the tale of his recent experience with a proper welded shipping container where they simple cut through the hinges with a portable acetylene torch.
So he had returned to find the door simply laying on the ground, and even though he didn't store anything of value in the unit, it is now a not so useful open ended box in a woodland.

For the garden, probably a good item to have - for the woodlands, I have serious doubts now unfortunately.
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby davetb » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:42 pm

Zathras wrote:
The clincher for me though was when a woodsman helper gave me the tale of his recent experience with a proper welded shipping container where they simple cut through the hinges with a portable acetylene torch.
So he had returned to find the door simply laying on the ground, and even though he didn't store anything of value in the unit, it is now a not so useful open ended box in a woodland.

For the garden, probably a good item to have - for the woodlands, I have serious doubts now unfortunately.


I fully agree.
My one doesn't leak, and it's been in some heavy South Wales thunderstorms.
The roof drops down about an inch onto the sides, so the rain would need to be forced up.

As for the condensation I plan to be unconventional and put a timber 'roof' on it to act as insulation. Similar to a decking roof, and I can also walk / store roof boxes on it. I don't know if it will work, time will tell.
I have a very cheap, metal shed that needed a corrugated bitumen roof, to keep it dry. It has never had a condensation issue & I store chicken wild bird feed. I'm hoping it's the 'extra' roof that stops the condensation.
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby smojo » Sat Jun 07, 2014 8:13 am

I've been thinking about the whole storage on site issue for when I get my wood. I have a theory that leaving anything that is visible attracts attention to no-goods and even if they don't intend to steal, will have a go at getting in, or damaging it just for the malicious fun they get. So my approach is probably to leave nothing immediately visible. I'll take most of my tools as I need them. I'd rather have that inconvenience than the annoyance and disappointment of someone having stolen or broken it. There will have to be some things left, like a wheelbarrow but I intend trying to hide it as best as possible, find an overgrown area and cover with dead wood or something.
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby oldclaypaws » Sat Jun 07, 2014 9:38 am

I'd say thats a sensible approach Smojo. I'd never leave the brushcutter or chainsaw kit on site when they are worth a total of £1000+ and can go in the car. Lower value bulky items are of less attraction to thieves. A pal has a shed, but never leaves high value items in it and leaves it open. He says why lock it when they'll just break the door down and cause damage getting in?
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Re: Flat Pack Shipping Container

Postby smojo » Sat Jun 07, 2014 1:52 pm

He says why lock it when they'll just break the door down and cause damage getting in?


That's exactly what my old mate thought about his car. Back in the 1970/80ss he lived in Chapeltown in Leeds - a notorious rough area that was home to thieves, prostitutes and all the scumbags you can find. He had an old Ford Cortina MK3 and deliberately left it unlocked so potential thieves could get in without damaging it. He left nothing to nick, not even a radio. He set off to work one morning. The engine sounded louder than usual and a mile or so down the road, started belching smoke and steam. He looked under the bonnet to find his radiator had been nicked! Just a slashed top and bottom hose left gaping where it had been. That's how determined some people are to relief you of your property!
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